Friday, April 28, 2006

Blog-O-Rama 4-28

Rather than doing another Headline UpdateTM, today we'll give Tonto, Tarzan & Frankenstein a well-deserved break, and get a bit more verbose as we troll around the blogosphere.

Rush busted settles drug case
Outside the Beltway reports that Rush Limbaugh has turned himself in after an arrest warrant was issued related to his prescription drug use. He was booked and released on $3,000 bond. UPDATE: Brian Maloney clears away the media spin at the Radio Equalizer. This "arrest" is actually a plea deal that settles the case.

Mollohan's magic
Don Surber notices that the investigation into Al "Beach Boy" Mollohan seems to be getting more serious. (Surber's pushing for "Cheat River Al" as Mollohan's nom-de-scandal, but we're sticking to "Beach Boy.") The Other Paper mentions that, with Mollohan's troubles and DeLay's resignation, the Dems' hopes of recapturing the House have dimmed.

Blogdullah Al-Hakkar
Michelle Malkin reports that a Saudi-based hacker took down a blog server, thereby disabling numerous conservative blogs. More tolerance from the Religion of Peace! By the way, you'd be surprised how often we get hits from Middle Eastern ISPs from people searching for "donkey sex."

Air (Un-)America Update
Brian Maloney reports that Air America's already microscopic radio ratings have fallen still further. Maybe Al Franken & Co. can come up with some more brilliant publicity stunts -- like ripping off more money from children's charities -- to boost their numbers.

Israel Insight
Jiblog points out an excellent article about Israel by Michael Totten. I was dismayed by the comments of Lisa Goldman: "These people will never hurt me. They are my friends. They love me." There ought to be a word for this kind of suicidal myopia. How many times do the Islamofascists have to say, "We hate you and we want to kill you," before we believe them?

McKinney dodges blog bullet
Atlanta blogger Will Hinton says he's decided he can't afford to challenge Cynthia McKinney. Too bad. It might have been fun. (Remember, folks: I invented hatin' on Cynthia, I predicted her meltdown, and I was the first right-winger to stop hatin' on her.)

Jose, can you see?
Violence Worker notices that this whole Spanglish National Anthem thing is pushing buttons for a lot of Americans who've gotten fed up with illegal aliens.

KKKrazy
Doug Bandow reports that the Klan has gotten a permit to rally at the national battlefield near Sharpsburg. (That's about 15 miles from my house, BTW. My great-grandfather fought at Sharpsburg -- the 13th Alabama was then part of Colquitt's brigade.) The KKK is a bad joke that's getting worse. Everybody knows it's a complete farce. Nowadays, if there's a KKK rally and five Klansmen show up, four of them will be undercover cops and the fifth will be an FBI agent.

Ralph Reed, cont'd
Erick at Peach Pundit reported — and has since pulled his report — that the contest between Ralph Reed and Casey Cagle seems to have split the College Republicans in Georgia. (Erick also says Democratic gubernatorial candidate Cathy Cox has a "deep, sultry, sexy voice." I'll think of a joke later.) Meanwhile, Cagle has written a letter to Georgia Republicans talking about Reed's "slash and burn" tactics: "Ralph’s record as a highly paid, DC lobbyist shows a pattern of deception, money laundering and hypocrisy. That pattern has now been exposed by every media outlet in the country – from the Washington Post to the AJC to conservative publications like World magazine and the Weekly Standard." Uh, Senator Cagle, you forgot to add, "... and in the excellent new book DONKEY CONS."

Bias? What bias?
Outside the Beltway reports that Jim VandeHei of the Other Paper doesn't like Fox News, and complained about having to watch it on Air Force One. Hint to Jim: You're on Air Force One, OK? I guarantee you there are, oh, 45,000 reporters in this country who would be glad to take your seat on Air Force One, if you get tired of watching Brian Kilmeade on "Fox and Friends." So sit down, shut up and have another donut.

-- McCAIN

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Brilliant!

The miracle of the Internet has not only improved humanity's power to research and communicate, it's also given birth to new forms of Democratic chicanery. Alert Donkey Cons blogger Clicktodoorstep sent us the lowdown on an innovative campaign technique patented by one Morton Brilliant, reported today in the Seattle Times:
Morton Brilliant, Gov. Christine Gregoire's former campaign spokesman, resigned this week from his latest campaign job amid allegations that he changed an online Wikipedia biography of an opponent in Georgia's gubernatorial race.

An Internet address registered to Brilliant was also used to make changes last year to an online biography of Republican Dino Rossi, Gregoire's opponent in 2004. The address also was used to edit the biography of South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford, another Republican Brilliant has campaigned against.

In each case, the alterations added links to newspaper stories that revealed negative or embarrassing information about the politicians
.
Now, of course, the technique has backfired resulting in negative and embarrassing stories about Mr. Brilliant:
Mr. Brilliant, who is from South Carolina, had been working for more than a year as the campaign manager for Georgia Secretary of State Cathy Cox, a Democrat who is running for governor.

Early this week, the campaign for Lt. Gov. Mark Taylor, Cox's opponent in the Democratic primary, revealed that a Cox campaign Internet address registered to Brilliant was used last fall to alter the Wikipedia profiles of Brilliant's past and present political foes.

The changes to Taylor's biography added information about his son's drunken-driving arrest. Taylor's son was charged last year after an accident that left his best friend dead
.
Alas, it turns out that Mr. Brilliant may be not only decidely un-brilliant, but also a heartless creep.

-- VINCENT

From McCAIN: Talk about media bias! The Seattle Times article fails to mention that the King County Democrats stole the election for Gregoire. She should always be referred to as Her Fraudulency, the Faux Governor. If Maria Cantwell gets beat in November, one reason will be voters' lingering resentment of the grand theft committed by the Gregoire Gang in 2004.

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Thursday, April 27, 2006

Surber KO's "Beach Boy"

Al "Beach Boy" Mollohan goes down for the count in the first round vs. Don "Poca Kid" Surber:
This is genius. He deserves a Nobel Prize in political science for this discovery.

Mollohan's plan is simple. Get elected and re-elected 12 times. Send taxpayer money to groups headed by friends through congressional earmarks. Have friends contribute to your campaign and go halfsies on a beach house or a farm.

What could possibly go wrong?
Yeah, go read the whole thing, but please come back, because I'd like to score some easy pundit points here.

1. In addition to Avaricious Al's appetite for upscale real-estate, the Dems' real problem in West Virginia is that the state's economy keeps spiraling downward despite all those years of populist posturing by Democrats like Byrd and the Mollohans, Sr. & Jr. It's all fine and good to vote for the "party of the working man," right up until their idiotic policies start driving so many jobs out your state that you aren't working. For all of Byrd's pork-barrel prowess, there's only so much that New Deal-style make-work boondoggles can do to boost West Virginia's economy. Except for the Eastern Panhandle -- cheap real estate for D.C.-area retirees and commuters who can't afford to live in Germantown or Herndon -- the state is rapidly losing population. The Dems' environmental allies are hampering the coal industry, while the Dems' labor allies make W.Va. unattactive to manufacturing investors. States like Alabama, Kentucky and Mississippi are getting new industrial plants that West Virginia can't seem to attract.

2. It's important to distinguish between, on the one hand, cozying up to special interests in the hunt for campaign contributions -- which is what the Abramoff scandal is really about -- and , on the other hand, using one's office for personal enrichment. The suggestion made by Mollohan's antagonists is that he is guilty of the latter offense -- the same thing, basically, that sent "Duke" Cunnningham to federal prison. Some may say that it's worse to suck up to special interests, swapping legislative favors for campaign cash, but that sort of involves the assumption that whatever is good for the special interests (Big Oil, labor unions, George Soros, etc.) is bad for the country. I don't know: The Teamsters or the tobacco lobby (or Buddhist nuns) might occasionally be right about something, and collecting campaign cash is not illegal. But it is definitely wrong and illegal to get yourself elected to Congress -- a job that pays $160,000 a year -- and then prostitute your office so you can have a beach house off the Carolina coast.

3. Live by the class warfare, die by the class warfare. As soon as Surber posted the picture of Mollohan's beach house, I knew this was a big scandal, at least to West Virginia voters. If you're a guy working two jobs to support your wife and kids, and you've been voting Democrat for years because you figure they're "on your side," it's a mighty big kick in the head to pick up your newspaper and see that your Democratic congressman is living like ... well, like a Republican. The Mollohan scandal is, ultimately, less about a quid pro quo and more about "Little Al's got himself a beach house."

The Mollohan scandal perfectly highlights the "Party of the Rich" factor that we dissect in Chapter 9 of DONKEY CONS. The populist image and class-warfare rhetoric of Democrats clashes very sharply with the reality of a party that's dependent on millions of dollars in campaign cash from corporate donors (wait until you learn the truth about the Enron-Clinton connection), and whose leading figures are rich snobs like Nancy Pelosi, Ted Kennedy and John Kerry.

-- McCAIN

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About the book
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Hope against hope

Here's how desperate the Democrats are: In announcing the first 22 "targeted" House races for 2006, Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee chairman Rahm "Hired Truck" Emanuel named eight districts where John Kerry got 45% or less of the vote in 2004. Josephine Hearn of The Hill reports:
Confident that their political prospects are the rosiest in recent memory, House Democrats are planning a more aggressive effort to direct money to promising Democratic challengers this year.

Over the next week, they will kick off a revamped Red to Blue Program that will benefit more challengers and start earlier than in previous election years.

In 2004, Red to Blue raised $7.5 million for 27 candidates, resulting in an average take of more than $250,000 per campaign. Democrats hope to improve on those numbers.

Rep. Rahm Emanuel (D-Ill.), chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC), revealed the names of the first 22 beneficiaries of the program in a letter yesterday to his Democratic colleagues. For the most part, they represent the strongest Democratic challengers.

“This is an exclusive program that rewards the candidates and campaigns that are most skilled, not only at raising money on their own, but at getting their message across to the voters they hope to represent,” Emanuel wrote. Other members active in the program concurred, adding that fundraising ability and success attracting press coverage had been key criteria in selecting the members.

You can go read the whole thing, but the key point is that Emanuel -- even to have a mathematical possibility of taking back the House for Dems -- is apparently forced to "target" districts that went 55%-64% for Bush in 2006.

Among those are certain obvious choices: The 50th District in California, where former Rep. Duke Cunningham is now in federal prison. I mean, when a congressman goes down in a huge stinking scandal, that's got to be some kind of an opportunity, and you can't blame Emanuel for targeting the seat. But as DailyKos has noted, Dem challenger Francine Busby can't break 45% in a district that's still staunchly Republican.

But some of the other DCCC "targets" are simply hopeless. I'd say it's a waste of time and money for Democrats to support Heath Shuler in North Carolina's 11th District, where incumbent Republican Rep. Charles Taylor has a district that gave just 43% of its vote for Kerry in 2004. Ditto for Ken Lucas' hopes of knocking off incumbent Republican Rep. Geoff Davis in Kentucky's 4th District, where Kerry got just 36% in 2004.

Note that Emanuel is touting the success of the Dems' "Red to Blue" program in raising $7.5 million in 2004. But the GOP kicked butt in 2004. When your definition of "success" doesn't actually involve winning elections, you've got a problem. (MoveOn.org is the most obvious example of this problem.)

There are some genuinely hopeful districts on the DCCC's target list, but not anything like enough to take down the GOP House majority. And remember, Dems have to defend some vulnerable seats, too -- there's Al "Beach Boy" Mollohan in West Virginia, for instance. But some of Emanuel's "targets" make no sense at all: Why go after Republican Rep. John Hostettler in Indiana's 8th District, where Kerry got just 38% of the vote in 2004?

It's true that Hostettler has an aversion to fundraising -- he doesn't take PAC money -- and has faced a series of close contests in the past. But winning that district will be a cinch for any GOP campaign team with a lick of sense:
  • Bring in Dick Cheney, Condi Rice and other big names for fundraising events.
  • Schedule an early light run of warm "feel-good" ID ads on radio and TV: "John Hostettler: Great American."
  • As soon as the Dem challenger goes negative (it's a given), do the anti-negative thing: "Why is Brad Ellsworth resorting to dirty smear tactics against a great American like Johh Hostettler?"
This is Campaigning 101, and given Republicans' awareness of their vulnerability in this mid-term election, the GOP will send in their ace guys to help Hostettler if he really needs it. So despite all the talk, Indiana's 8th is a real long shot for Emanuel & Co.

The Democrats are pumping sunshine up everybody's skirts right now, and what they're risking is a repeat of what happened with the bogus exit-poll numbers on Election Day 2004: Everybody gets all giddy and expectant and then, when the bitter reality comes home to roost, there's a furious backlash.

Emanuel would be smart to remind Democrats that, despite their party's genuine positives for 2006, the GOP isn't going to roll over and play dead between here and November. I've been telling people that this election's going to be rough-and-tumble fight, a real thrill ride that keeps everybody awake until the wee hours on Nov. 8. It's going to be close, and there's no telling at this point how it will turn out. But looking at this DCCC list of 22 top "targets," I don't get the sense that Emanuel has any special mojo working.

-- McCAIN

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Wednesday, April 26, 2006

"Culture of Corruption" update 4-27

As predicted in Chapter One of DONKEY CONS (page 15, to be more specific), Nancy Pelosi's idea of making a "culture of corruption" the central issue of the 2006 campaign is beginning to backfire. Even in one of the worst years for GOP scandals, the Democratic Party manages to keep pace.

The Al Mollohan scandal has drawn attention to the Democrats' problems on the ethics front:
You may have missed it, but that dull, thudding sound in the political background over the weekend was Republicans pummeling Democrats on, of all things, corruption.
That's because last Friday, the top-ranking Democrat on the House ethics committee, West Virginia's Alan Mollohan, was forced to step down temporarily from that post over charges of — what else? — unethical behavior.
And Republicans didn't miss this golden opportunity to pile on.

“Only surpassed by Howard Dean, this was the biggest gift we’ve gotten,” said David Winston, a Republican strategist. "This puts the Democratic leadership on notice that they’re throwing stones in a glass house,” said Kevin Madden, spokesman for House Majority leader John Boehner.

“This is the pinnacle,” Carl Forti, spokesman for the National Republican Congressional Committee, rejoiced. ...

Losing a leader to scandal is never good, but Mollohan’s fall undermines a key pillar of the Democratic efforts to take back the House and Senate in November. Democrats have invested time and money pushing the idea of what they call the "Republican culture of corruption" as exemplified by the Jack Abramoff lobbying scandal and the fall of former House Majority Leader Tom Delay. “[Ethics] had been an important strategic element of the campaign,” says Winston, and with Mollohan’s troubles, “It just got incredibly difficult for them to play that card."

That's from Time magazine, hardly a bastion of the Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy. But notice the way they phrase it: Democrats are accused "of all things, corruption" -- as if this were shocking, as if Pelosi's "culture of corruption" charge was something other than another Democratic Party lie.

ATTENTION TIME MAGAZINE:
As clearly explained -- and carefully documented -- on Page 36 of DONKEY CONS, we counted members of Congress convicted of serious crimes or disciplined for ethics violations over the past 30 years. The final tally: Dems 46, GOP 15. That's a 3-to-1 ratio -- and that Republican count includes both Duke Cunningham and Tom DeLay.
Josephine Hearn of The Hill has more.

DONKEY CONS is, as we've said on dozens of talk-radio programs in the past couple of weeks, a book about "a party and a pattern." For over 200 years, corruption has been so deeply bred into their donkey DNA that Lynn and I were confident that any attempt by Democrats to turn the ethics issue against the GOP would result in a self-inflicted (and perhaps fatal) wound to Dems' hopes of recapturing Congress in the 2006 mid-term elections. That prophecy is now being fulfilled, big-time.

Other journalists and politicians are taking notice. Doug Turner of the Buffalo News explains:
Rep. Thomas M. Reynolds [R-N.Y.] wants the national political community to know about Congressman Alan Mollohan, a Democrat from West Virginia.

Reynolds, the Clarence Republican, is chairman of the party's campaign to retain the GOP's 12-year control of the House. As the threat of a Democratic resurgence grows, the GOP is looking for one really bad Democrat, and hope they have found it in Mollohan.

Mollohan channeled millions in special appropriations called "earmarks" to his depressed Charleston district and made business deals with some who are getting the federal money.

Mollohan has become suddenly wealthy, and he's stumbling with his explanations.

As a measurement of today's standards of objective morality in Congress, Mollohan was until late Friday the top Democrat on the House Ethics Committee.

Mollohan quit the panel under heat from Reynolds.

If the MSM is noticing this phenomenon, you can bet the conservative media and the blogosphere have been all over it. Here's columnist Eliot Peace in TownHall.com:
Despite all of the bad news over the last several months, and the talk of a 1994-like sweep of the US House of Representatives by the Democratic Party, not all news is bad news for Republicans.

First and foremost, the Democratic Party has yet to present a united front and viable alternative to the GOP. Several Democratic congressmen, including William Jefferson of Louisiana and Alan Mollohan of West Virginia, are amidst their own ethics investigations, which helps to soften the impact of the 'culture of corruption' charges leveled at the Republican Party.

Exactly so. Rep. Jefferson is knee-deep in scandal, Cynthia McKinney's beating up cops, the former Democratic mayor of Atlanta has been convicted of tax evasion, the former Democratic governor of Alabama is about to go on trial for corruption ... the hits just keep coming!

Meanwhile, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee is headed by Rep. Rahm "Hired Truck" Emanuel and Sen. Harry Reid is vowing to keep every dime he got from Abramoff's clients. Yet Nancy Pelosi (who got money from Abramoff's clients, too) keeps on dreaming of victory in November -- it's like a bad joke, but Pelosi doesn't seem to get it.

Meanwhile, at Captain's Quarters, Captain Ed notices that Debbie Stabenow was a friend of "Indian Jack" Abramoff's clients:
The Abramoff corruption scandal got just a teensy bit wider today when Michigan Senator Debbie Stabenow resubmitted her campaign finance reports from 2002 and 2003 to show that she took donations from Indian tribes connected to the disgraced lobbyist. ...

The change points out yet another Democrat that not only took contributions from Abramoff-related tribes but also intervened on their behalf.
Please, by all means, go read the whole thing -- and tell the Captain to e-mail me if he wants to review the book. Meanwhile, other blogs are picking up on the pattern of Democratic Party corruption: Pardon My English, Dan Riehl, Steve Kelso, Michelle Malkin, Clear and Present, et cetera.

Not every blogger or talk-radio host in America has realized yet that there's an entire book that fully documents this phenomenon of Democratic Party corruption. (C'mon, guys: Give Max a call.) But eventually everyone from Rush Limbaugh to Glenn Reynolds will get the book, and when they do, they'll turn to the index and find that on pp. 266-288 are the names of dozens and dozens of members of Congress mentioned in the book. Heh. Pretty much a field guide, y'see?

Now it's time to quote what we wrote on Page 15 of DONKEY CONS:
Maybe Democrats think Americans are stupid. ... But just how stupid do they think we are? At this writing, Nancy Pelosi and her friends are talking about how Democrats will win control of Congress in 2006 by campaigning against a Republican "culture of corruption." ... If Democrats try to make "corruption" the central issue of their campaign, they'll surely lose — and we'll probably sell a lot more books.
Hey, Nancy: You go, girl!
If Pelosi and the Democrats keep going at this rate, we'll be millionaires by November.

-- McCAIN

CHARITABLE OMISSION ALERT

It must have been charity, or possibly the onset of carpal tunnel caused by the ceaseless task of chronicling Democratic corruption, that caused Stacy to omit from his scandal roundup the latest news on Sowande Omokunde.

Mr. Omokunde, the son of Democratic Rep. Gwen Moore (D-Wisc.), was today sentenced to four to six months in prison for slashing tires outside a Bush-Cheney campaign office on Election Day 2004. Three other Democratic campaign workers were also found guilty.
Tossing aside a plea agreement that called for probation, Milwaukee Circuit Court Judge Michael Brennan sentenced four Democratic Party workers today to jail for slashing the tires of 25 vans rented by Republicans to take voters to polls for the 2004 presidential election.
BTW, the judge was not a happy camper:
Calling the vandalism more than harmless hijinks, Brennan admonished the four men, including the sons of two prominent Milwaukee politicians, for disenfranchising voters.

The judge said he had received letters from Milwaukee County citizens upset over the crime. “They see you tampering with something they consider sacred and that’s the ballot box,” Brennan said.
Of course, such tactics are nothing new for Democrats. As we note in DONKEY CONS, they go back 150 years to the time of Tammany Hall, when Democratic New York Mayor Fernando Wood, supplied a "'crowd of loafers and bruisers' as a political street army." No word of any tire slashings in the 1850's. But probably only because tires hadn't been invented yet.

- VINCENT

MEAN-SPIRITEDNESS ALERT

Since Lynn's pouring salt into wounds here, let's notice -- with a hat tip to Chris Reed -- that uber-blogger Markos Moulitsas Zúniga of DailyKos is dispirited by Francine Busby's 45% poll number:

This is a district in which the former Congressman is in prison for corruption far beyond the usual "culture of corruption" craziness, and our candidate's own internal poll doesn't have her above the Kerry line for the district? I don't think this poll looks all that hot for us, frankly. In fact, I think it looks terrible.

If voters were ready to punish Republicans for their culture of corruption, what better place for that to manifest itself than in the district of one of the most corrupt of the lot?

Yeah, the adulation of dimwit leftists has made the Moonbat-in-Chief a bestselling author. But that doesn't win elections. Heh.

-- McCAIN

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About the book
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WorldNetDaily: Rave review

DONKEY CONS "should give pause to even diehard Democrats," Judith Reisman writes in WorldNetDaily:
Although the far-left media has "equalized" Republican and Democratic scandals, "over the past 30 years in Congress, there have been three times as many Democratic crooks as Republican ones." They count and document them.

This informative, important chronicle belongs on public and private reference shelves everywhere. Spread the word! It is a lively, spirited read.

Well done Vincent and McCain!

Go read the whole thing.

-- McCAIN

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Reed's slime trail

From political consultant to candidate, not exactly a smooth transition for Ralph Reed:
Not long after leaving the Christian Coalition for the secular world of electoral politics, Ralph Reed bemoaned the dark side of his new career.

"One of the things I'm rapidly discovering about this business is that you rarely have a guy who doesn't have any problems," Reed said in 1998, just before the first clients he served as a campaign consultant stood for election. "I'm still looking for Mr. Clean Jeans."

Eight years later, as Reed runs for lieutenant governor of Georgia, his critics suggest that he, too, has been splattered by political mud.

His opponent for the Republican nomination, state Sen. Casey Cagle, tried to turn Reed's political consulting into a campaign issue last weekend when he offered a surprising reason for donating $1,000 to Democratic Lt. Gov. Mark Taylor's 1998 campaign: atonement for Reed's malevolent tactics on behalf of one of his earliest clients, Taylor's Republican opponent. Cagle describes Reed's style as "slash and burn, threaten and smear, attack and lie."

Reed denies authorizing or using dirty campaign tactics and says that he doesn't approve of them. An Atlanta Journal-Constitution examination of his consulting work — including interviews with his rivals and colleagues and a review of court files and other documents — revealed no evidence that contradicted Reed's denials.

Still, a common thread connects many of the campaigns Reed has advised:

From slow-motion footage of Taylor shaking hands with Atlanta's "black" mayor, as the ad's script pointed out despite the fact it was self-evident, to a picture of a black opponent dissolving into shots of jail cells and used hypodermic needles, to a whisper campaign accusing Arizona Sen. John McCain of fathering an "illegitimate" black child, Reed's clients or their supporters relied on negative racial imagery and other tactics that reflect a style of campaigning that, while not unique, was especially rough.

Critics point to the similarity in strategies used by so many of Reed's clients and question how he couldn't know what they were doing.

"He's a total hypocrite," said Roy Fletcher, a Baton Rouge, La., political consultant who worked for McCain's presidential campaign in 2000. "There's no question about it. The fingerprint is there."
You can read the whole thing. Let me make two separate and distinct points:

1. Reed's entire adult life has been spent in GOP politics, in contrast to Cagle, who was a businessman before taking an interest in politics. That accounts a lot for the differences between them.

2. Reed's alleged use of race issues in Georgia and South Carolina campaigns is troubling, but par for the course, considering Reed's background.

My friend Jeff Quinton used to be a GOP campaign operative in South Carolina, and Jeff tells me that there is nothing dirtier than a South Carolina Republican primary. Push-polling and other dirty tricks are standard operating procedure. Thus, one gets tired of the incessant whining from John McCain's supporters about the "love child" rumors spread by his opponents in the 2000 GOP S.C. primary. The national media, if they cared to investigate, would discover that those sorts of tactics are routine in South Carolina primary politics.

Yet the media and McCain's supporters continue to pretend that the "love child" rumor was solely responsible for John McCain's 2000 defeat in South Carolina. That's a lie. McCain was out-organized and out-campaigned by Bush in the state. Bush's people had the state wired from the beginning, and McCain performed badly in the one big televised debate.

-- McCAIN

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Monday, April 24, 2006

Vilmar's Voice

In a rare book review over at Right Wing Howler, uber-blogger Vilmar has this to say about Donkey Cons: Sex, Crime, and Corruption in the Democratic Party:

I very rarely review books as I am not practiced at it. But this one is worth doing.
First off, the premise of the book as I see it: A damning indictment of the corruption of the Democratic Party, going back a couple of hundred years and at the same time, an infuriating glimpse into how they seemingly get away with it and continue to be adored. One need only look at the adoration the left heaps upon the likes of Bill and Hillary Clinton, Ted Kennedy, Robert Byrd, John Kerry, etc.


Suffice it to say I could not stand to read the book for more than a few minutes at once as it pissed me off so much and caused my blood pressure to rise.


This reaction is, of course, clinically appropriate. Conservatives and liberals should be angry about the content of Donkey Cons, packed as it is with documented specifics, the low-down on a party that was built on the kind of ethical rationale Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn once referred to as the "foundations of lawlessness."

Vilmar continues:

The book itself is crammed with facts and events. Dozens and dozens of examples are provided. All meticulously footnoted. Your mouth will stand agape as you read instance after instance of corruption, greed, malfeasance, criminal actions, plots, and con-artist behavior.
The book starts at the birth of our nation and highlighted the antics of the first Democrat, Aaron Burr, runs quickly to the 19th Century and the corruption in the Tammany Hall escapades.


The 20th century is well represented, of course, and the book basically ends at early 2006.
Some critics have come out braying about how the book is so one-sided. Well, DUH!!!! It’s ABOUT Democrats! But the authors don’t shy away from slamming Republicans, too. Only not as many. If someone on the left wants to do something similar and substitute “REPUBLICAN” for “DEMOCRAT”, I’d be willing to give it a read. However, I will not hold my breath as the authors would...struggle at finding the [similar] level and depth of corruption within the Republican Party.


You go, Vilmar. We did, in fact, extend a similar invitation to liberal writers in Chapter One of the book. We can even suggest a title for any such endeavor: Republi-Cons. But those accepting our invitation should remember that Donkey Cons isn't merely a laundry list of scandal; it's about a 200-year pattern of corruption, involving crooked urban machines, alliance with corrupt labor unions, mob control, treason, subversion, immigration hijinx, rank hypocrisy -- as well jumping into bed with felons.

If there's a parallel pattern in the GOP, please uncover it -- but bring your footnotes. We've got more than 650 of em.

Click here to read the rest of Vilmar's review.

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Sunday, April 23, 2006

Democrats' Dixie debacles

The Democratic Party seems to be in freefall in the South. (Zell tried to warn them! )

In Georgia, the prospects for Democrats to recapture their former power are bleak, Jim Wooten suggests:

President Bush carried 123 state House districts and [state] 38 Senate districts. State Rep. Jill Chambers of Atlanta is the only Republican who represents a legislative district that John Kerry carried.
As old-line conservative Democrats, such as [former state House Speaker Terry] Coleman or Bill Cummings of Rockmart, retire, their replacements are likely to be Republican. And with the retirement of whites who have represented majority-black districts, such as those in Clayton and the one held by former House Judiciary Committee Chairman Tom Bordeaux of Savannah, who won't seek re-election, successors are likely to be black Democrats.
The next House Democratic caucus will likely be majority black, also a first. Interestingly, too, their numbers in the Legislature are likely to match their numbers in the population.
Democrats cannot retake the House. It would be a great year for them if they hold 78 seats. Nor can they retake the Senate; at best, voting patterns indicate, they could take three seats or at worst, lose one.
After November's election, the realignment will be almost complete.


Go read the whole thing.

In Alabama, meanwhile, former Democratic governor Don Siegelman begins a federal corruption trial May 1, but keeps campaigning to get back his old job:

Former Gov. Don Siegelman is running his race for governor in a way voters have never seen -- trial court by day and campaign by night.Siegelman spent Wednesday through Friday at the federal courthouse in Montgomery for
selection of the jury for his government corruption trial.
Siegelman and the jury return May First for the start of testimony, which attorneys estimate could last four to eight weeks.
Siegelman says every evening you will see us leave this courtroom for a campaign destination point.
He set the pace by having a rally Tuesday night in Birmingham and then driving to Montgomery for the beginning of jury selection Wednesday morning.
Campaign spokesman Chip Hill says Siegelman will make speeches in the evening, hit late-night and early-morning shift changes at plants, and drop by 24-hour department stores when he's not in court each day from nine to five.
Siegelman's criminal case is also affecting Lt. Gov. Lucy Baxley -- his main opponent in the Democratic primary on June Sixth.
Baxley is busy making appearances across the state, but she says she hasn't had much media coverage because reporters have been focused either on Siegelman's legal problems or Republican Gov. Bob Riley's actions with the Legislature and other state business.
"Whatever time was available to cover the governor's race has been filled by the governor and former governor," Baxley says.
Because of the lack of media coverage, Baxley says, "people are saying they are not hearing anything from the Baxley campaign."


Go read the whole thing.

-- McCAIN

DONKEY CONS: Buy it
DONKEY CONS: Buy TWO!
DONKEY CONS: Rave review
DONKEY CONS: Another rave review
DONKEY CONS: Yet ANOTHER rave review
DONKEY CONS: About the book
DONKEY CONS: On Book TV
DONKEY CONS: On Capitol Hill

Oops! She did it again

Cynthia McKinney calls her communications director a "fool." (Hat tip: Jeff Quinton)

-- McCAIN

Ralph Reed's decline continues

In a debate in Buckhead -- the affluent northside of Atlanta -- a startling revelation in the campaign for Georgia's lieutenant governor:

The Republican campaign for lieutenant governor in 1998 was so bitter, so dirty, that Casey Cagle and another top Republican Senate leader each gave a $1,000 apology to the Democratic victor, Mark Taylor.
The admission from Cagle came during a Saturday debate with Ralph Reed, the former head of the Christian Coalition and Cagle's Republican rival for lieutenant governor.
But Cagle said it was Reed, as a fledgling political consultant, who was responsible for a "horrible, horrible" campaign for lieutenant governor by Fulton County Commission then-Chairman Mitch Skandalakis, in which Taylor was wrongly accused of drug addiction.
"Cleaning up Ralph's mess," said Cagle, a Gainesville businessman, after the morning debate in Buckhead. ...


Republicans still believe that African-American reaction to Skandalakis' campaign, widely viewed as racially divisive, led to the defeat of Guy Millner, the Republican candidate for governor that year, and the election of Democrat Roy Barnes.

Skandalakis, a Sandy Springs lawyer, was among Reed's first political clients after Reed left as executive director of the national Christian Coalition.
The ad that prompted the apology featured a Taylor look-alike shuffling down the hallway of what was meant to be a drug rehabilitation center. Taylor had sdmitted to using cocaine and marijuana in the early 1980s, but the TV spot suggested that Taylor's drug use had continued.
Taylor filed a $1 million slander suit against Skandalakis. It was settled for $50,000, and Taylor gave the money to charity.
"It's disheartening to know that some of the horrible, horrible ads that were run in this process were actually directed by my opponent," Cagle said Saturday. "They were not factual. They were downright wrong."


You can go read the whole thing. Reed, of course, denies any association with the notorious 1998 ads, just like he denies having known that Jack Abramoff's money came from Indian casino tribes. People around Reed keep going to federal prison -- three years ago, Reed's former client Skandalakis copped a plea in a federal bribery case -- and Reed keeps walking away from these ethical disasters. Casey Cagle, however, may finally succeed in giving Reed a long overdue lesson in accountability.

Previously on Ralph Reed:

4/20: WSJ notices Reed's problems
3/11: Mene, mene, tekel, upharsin
3/4: Reed "flat-out wrong."

-- McCAIN

DONKEY CONS: Buy it
DONKEY CONS: Buy TWO!
DONKEY CONS: Rave review
DONKEY CONS: Another rave review
DONKEY CONS: Yet ANOTHER rave review
DONKEY CONS: About the book
DONKEY CONS: On Book TV
DONKEY CONS: On Capitol Hill